Human Rights Day

Human Rights Day marks the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by United Nations (UN) members on December 10, 1948. The Declaration arose directly from the experience of the Second World War and represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are entitled. A Canadian, John Peters Humphrey, was the primary author of the Declaration. It is arguably the world's most influential document on human rights, inspiring human rights frameworks across the globe.

Read the Declaration in English, French, Spanish, and 370 other translations.

Each person plays an important role in shaping a society where diversity and inclusion are valued and human rights principles are reflected in our systems, policies, attitudes and behaviours. On Human Rights Day, all Albertans are encouraged to join communities across the globe as they celebrate our rights, as recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Visit the Commission's website for information about your rights and responsibilities under the Alberta Human Rights Act and the programs and services of the Commission.

The Commission offers a flyer and poster called Celebrate All Year Round to remind Albertans of significant international, national and provincial days related to human rights and diversity. To order the flyer or poster, contact educationcommunityservices@gov.ab.ca or call 403-297-8407 in Calgary. Call toll-free from Alberta locations outside Calgary by first dialing 310-0000 then entering the 10-digit number.

Revised: December 1, 2015


The Alberta Human Rights Commission is an independent commission of the Government of Alberta.

Due to confidentiality concerns, the Commission cannot reply to complaints of discrimination by email. Please contact the Commission by phone or regular mail if you have a specific complaint.

You can access information about making FOIP requests for records held by the Commission on our Contact us page.

The Commission will make publications available in accessible formats upon request for people with disabilities who do not read conventional print.